Google, Microsoft, Amazon embrace 3D Touch in latest app updates

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With this year’s iPhone 6S and iPhone 6S Plus, Apple introduced a new mechanic for how users interact with apps, giving the phones force-sensitive “3D Touch” input. Of course, for an app to actually take advantage of that kind of input, a developer’s going to have to go back and intentionally build support for such interactions. But will they actually take the time to do so, especially with only the newest iPhones supporting it? We’ve heard some nay-saying reports, sure, but devs looking to stay ahead of the curve have been wasting no time updating their apps for 3D Touch, and today we check out a trio of updates from big-name companies that include just such support.

Each of these apps uses 3D Touch in somewhat different ways. Amazon Video’s update delivers support for Next Up queuing, iPad Pro support, split-screen multitasking, X-Ray information on the media you’re watching, and its 3D Touch support gives users quick access to in-app navigation.

Microsoft OneDrive picks up improved search functionality and Intune support, while its 3D Touch implementation lets users quickly jump right in to recently-accessed files.

Finally, there’s Google Drive, which learns to push notifications related to shared files, and work better with iOS 9 search, in addition to its own 3D Touch support – here it serves multiple roles with access to search, recent files, and photo uploads.

Keep on the lookout for more and more iOS apps picking up 3D Touch features of their own.

Source: Apple Insider

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck

Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen’s first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he’s convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he’s not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bits

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