Gionee Elife S6 goes official in China with super-slim metallic body

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Realizing the ridiculousness of its never-ending quest for thinner and thinner phones, Gionee stopped at around 5mm last year, upping the ante to close to 7 now in order to also achieve respectable battery life.

Nonetheless, the just-unveiled Gionee Elife S6 is a beaut, with non-existent vertical display borders, pretty slim horizontal bezels as well, an overall remarkable 77.8 percent screen-to-body ratio, and a chassis made of 89 percent aluminum.

Sure, it resembles an iPhone a little, but it incredibly manages to tip the scales at 147 grams, and measure 151.9 x 74.6mm while sporting a 5.5-inch 720p AMOLED panel. In comparison, the 5.5-inch iPhone 6s Plus weighs a much bulkier 192 grams, sizing up at 158.2 x 77.9mm.

Best of all, the Gionee S6 squeezes a healthy 3,150 mAh juicer into the gaunt metal frame, using a reversible USB Type-C port to power the battery. For the equivalent of $266 (1,699 Yuan) in China, the Android 5.1 Lollipop-running phone is a multitasking beast too, courtesy of 3GB RAM, and accommodates a sizable 32 gigs of data internally, plus up to 128GB on a microSD card.

The somewhat low-res display and an octa-core MediaTek MT6753 processor clocked at only 1.3GHz are mainly the features that separate the Elife 6s from the high-end market segment, with 13 and 5MP cameras also short of impressive.

But the good news is we have every reason to believe the upper mid-ranger will head to the US soon under BLU branding, likely at an even lower price point than over on Asian shores. And you may find the handheld pretty irresistible at, say, 200 bucks.

Sources: Phonearena, Fonearena

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About The Author
Adrian Diaconescu

Adrian has had an insatiable passion for writing since he was in school and found himself writing philosophical essays about the meaning of life and the differences between light and dark beer. Later, he realized this was pretty much his only marketable skill, so he first created a personal blog (in Romanian) and then discovered his true calling, which is writing about all things tech (in English).