Microsoft’s first big Windows 10 update is headed out today

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Do you count yourself among the millions of PC users who took advantage of Microsoft’s free upgrade offer and have made the journey to Windows 10? The OS started hitting users as large back at the end of July, and though we’ve seen the arrival of smaller patches from day one, it’s finally time for something a little more substantial. Today Microsoft delivers just that, and begins distribution of what it’s calling the platform’s “first major update.”

So, what’s new? As we’d expect, quite a bit, and on the user-facing side we can look forward to some system-wide performance boosts, tweaks to the Edge browser (which picks up a tab preview and cross-device sync), and improvements to OneNote, Mail, Calendar, and more.

Cortana becomes available to users in Japan, Australia, Canada, and India, while also getting new pen-input support for us here in the States.

But Microsoft seems to be putting the most stock in what today’s update means for enterprise users, highlighting the arrival of its new Windows Update for Business and Windows Store for Business services, as well as new device management tools (including mobile). And while it’s not ready just yet, enterprise data protection should be on the way soon.

For you console buffs, we also hear that Windows 10 starts heading to the Xbox One as of today. Finally, Microsoft leaves us with a little teaser that smartphone updates are just around the corner, mentioning Windows 10 Mobile hitting “select mobile phones soon.”

Source: Microsoft

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck

Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen’s first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he’s convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he’s not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bits

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