Microsoft will soon make Windows 10 ‘Recommended Update’, provide easy installation for pirates

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You can’t always please the entirety of the very diverse crowd of PC users around the world, and sometimes, you have to make tough, largely unpopular decisions for the greater good in the long haul. That seems to be Microsoft’s approach of late to Windows 10 update policies after a predominantly successful start in the evolution of the new desktop OS iteration.

Redmond has already ignored public outcry over cumulative upgrades, which will continue to be enforced with an iron fist, and soon enough, the actual process of swapping Windows 7 or 8.1 for version 10 shall become “recommended” instead of optional.

There’s only one small step afterwards to mandatory system modernization, and beginning early next year, some people might feel essentially compelled to get on the Windows 10 bandwagon, which doesn’t sound very nice.

But again, it’s good for you, and you should do it of your own free will, since “Windows 10 is the best Windows ever – familiar, safer, faster, and full of innovations”, according to a blog post by Microsoft’s Executive VP of the Windows and Devices Group, Terry Myerson.

By the end of the year, Win 10 will be officially classified as an “Optional Update” for all 7 and 8.1 customers, then re-categorized as a “Recommended Update” in a few months. In both cases, you can turn off automatic updates (especially if you’re on a metered data connection), decline the installation, or roll back to 7 or 8.1 within 31 days of the move. It’s just that you’ll have to jump through extra hoops to stick to older software once Redmond cranks up its rollout efforts.

Speaking of, non-genuine users, aka pirates, will be offered a one-click opportunity to go legit in the US “soon”, as part of an experiment that, if successful, should spread worldwide sometime in 2016. Mind you, this is an easy, not free way of scoring a Genuine copy of Windows 10 either through Microsoft’s official store or by entering an activation code procured from a third-party retailer. No catches, no other strings attached.

Source: Windows Blogs

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About The Author
Adrian Diaconescu

Adrian has had an insatiable passion for writing since he was in school and found himself writing philosophical essays about the meaning of life and the differences between light and dark beer. Later, he realized this was pretty much his only marketable skill, so he first created a personal blog (in Romanian) and then discovered his true calling, which is writing about all things tech (in English).