Narrative Clip 2 wearable camera gains video and audio support

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Wearables aren’t just about smartwatches and fitness trackers; there’s a whole world out there of self-contained mobile hardware that’s meant to be worn on your person. One such device has been the Narrative Clip, a tiny digital camera intended for lifelogging, capturing a couple still shots each minute. This past January, Narrative announced its Clip 2, adding wireless connectivity, a wider-angle lens, and upgrading to a higher-res 8MP camera. Today Narrative announces a big upgrade coming to the Clip 2 before it hits customers, as the wearable gains video support.

When the Clip 2 finally ships this fall, users will be able to record video in addition to the camera’s standard still-shot support. Notably, that means the Clip 2 can capture audio. Video recording is triggered via a quick double-tap on the camera itself, and users can set the default recording time for these clips in advance. If you’re using the Clip 2 with a connected smartphone, you can also stop and start recording right through the camera’s app. There’s the option to record either in 720p or in full 1080p – you’re only constrained by the Clip 2’s 8GB storage capacity.

Pre-orders for the Clip 2 are open now, with shipments going out sometime this fall – there’s till no hard date. The tiny 1.42-inch-square camera is priced at just about $200, or $50 more than the firs-gen Clip (with no video support to speak of).

Source: Narrative

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!