WPC formally adopts new high-power, faster Qi wireless charging

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Wireless charging for smartphones has been making huge inroads upon the market this year, but when you need your handset recharged in a hurry, nothing beats the good old-fashioned wired way. The problem’s been that while access to wireless charging stations and phones that support them has been improving, these systems just can’t handle the same amount of power as something like a Quick Charge cable. Late last year we heard a little about efforts to do something about that, with Freescale Semiconductor cooking up a wireless charging solution that transmitted as much as 15 watts of power. Now that kind of output is becoming a formal part of the Qi standard, as the Wireless Power Consortium announces its own 15 watt effort.

While the group’s announcement doesn’t go into much detail, since Freescale itself is a member of the WPC, we suspect this might be the same tech we heard about last year. Even if it’s old news in that regard, getting official WPC support promises to really help with adoption (as who wants to risk building devices that support a system outside established standards), as well as signifies that wireless charging proponents are quite aware of the competition they face from high-speed wired alternatives.

There’s no word on when we might hope to see the availability of both phones and chargers that support this new higher-power Qi standard.

Source: WPC (PDF)
Via: Android Central

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!