Google Maps picks up improved real-time transit tools to help plan your journey

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Google Maps has already offered users access to detailed public transit information, letting them plan routes that move from train, to bus, to on foot, and back again. And with multiple options to go over at a glance, it’s let you choose the route that’s right for you. But as anyone who’s planned a multi-legged journey can attest to, plans have a nasty habit of going awry, and all too often we find ourselves having to make last-minute adjustments. Google’s rolling out some changes to Maps right now to make it easier to do just that.

Beyond showing you the info for the route you choose, Maps will keep you updated on alternate options, should you miss a connection or an unexpected delay keeps you from getting to the next leg of your trip on time. Google’s able to do this with the help of its transit partners, providing real-time data on public systems – and in addition to those whose data it already relies upon it’s adding a bunch of new sources for Chicago, San Francisco, and Seattle in the US, and the Netherlands, Budapest, and UK abroad.

Google still has a lot of work to go to make this live transit info available everywhere – and make Maps as useful as it can possibly be to users in un- and under-served areas – but things are only going to get better as it gets more and more agencies involved, just like it’s announcing today.

Source: Google

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck

Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen’s first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he’s convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he’s not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bits

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