Microsoft Office Lens for Android leaves preview, hits Play Store

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It was about two months ago when we first got word of Microsoft’s cross-platform ambitions for its incredibly useful Office Lens app. The once Windows Phone-exclusive lets you capture signs, documents – pretty much anything your phone’s camera can see – and converts them into nice, clean perspective- and color-corrected docs ready for sharing. At the time we leaned of a full-featured iOS app, as well as a preview release for Android users. Well, today the Android version of the app graduates to the big time, leaving its preview label behind and becoming available to all in the Google Play Store.

Office Lens lets Android users “scan” all the printed or written material they’d like, with tools to convert them into Office docs or PDFs. You’ll find features like automatic cropping, OCR capabilities to generate easily searchable text (and even extract contact info from business cards), and tight integration with Microsoft’s cloud services. Microsoft calls special attention to the ease of saving to multiple sources at once, letting you generate a local Word doc at the same time you send the image to OneDrive.

Especially if you lack access to a flatbed scanner, Office Lens sounds like it could be well worth checking out. If not for yourself, do it for the sake of your accountant, and free him from the indignity of squinting at off-axis, distorted photos of your W-2 next year.

Source: Microsoft

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!