Microsoft announces Cortana app for Android and iOS

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Windows 10 Mobile is going to be tightly integrated with Windows 10 on PCs: that’s a key pillar of Microsoft’s platform vision, and promises to help further streamline communication between devices. So while Microsoft smartphones will work smoothly with Windows 10 computers, what about those of us who run Windows on our PCs but elect to go with Android or iOS as our primary mobile ecosystems? Today Microsoft shares some of what it’s planning for Android and iOS users on Windows 10, including availability of a Cortana app.

That’s right: Microsoft’s voice assistant will soon be available to smartphone users everywhere, and no longer just those on Windows Phone devices. While the Android and iOS Cortana apps won’t have quite the tight system-level integration as on Windows handsets, lacking the ability to control phone settings or be triggered by voice command (at least, not out of the gate), they will still be ready to answer your questions and connect with the Cortana Notebook. The app should hit Android phones in about a month, and will be ready for iPhones sometime later in the year.

Beyond Cortana, we also learn some PC software called Phone Companion, which will help Android and iOS users configure their phones with apps connecting them to various Microsoft services, like OneDrive and OneNote. That will be available in a future Windows 10 preview release, in just a few weeks. Finally, an updated Xbox Music app for Android and iOS will land in a month or two that supports free playback of OneDrive-stored content.

Source: Microsoft

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!