Microsoft earnings report shows phone and tablet sales up from last year

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It’s that time again: three months have passed since we last got the chance to check out some Microsoft financial data, and now quarterly figures are once again due. Have the early months of 2015 been kind to Microsoft and its mobile hardware, or will we see evidence of a post-holiday-season slump? Let’s waste no more time and get right to the numbers.

The good news overall is that revenue is up, even if slimming profit margins mean that Microsoft is keeping less of it. Compared to the same quarter a year ago, revenue’s up six percent to $21.7B, but income is down five percent, coming in at about $6.6B total.

Surface revenue is similarly up year-on-year (an impressive 44 percent), making $713M for Microsoft, but it’s still down from last quarter’s $1.1B.

Microsoft sold some 8.6 million Lumia handsets, down from last quarter’s 10.5 million. Altogether, that accounts for revenues of $1.4B. Non-phone computer and gaming hardware (including all Xbox sales) revenue, on the other hand, is down from the same period last year, dropping about four percent. Licensing revenue saw an even larger drop, pulling in 24 percent less money than it did a year ago.

Like so many quarters before, that amounts to a mixed bag. Lumia sales may not quite be where Microsoft would like, but the figures here are far from dire, and suggest reason to be optimistic about next quarter’s sales.

Source: Microsoft
Via: The Verge

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!