Apple Watch material could lead to a stronger iPhone

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A soda can, airplane fuselage, and your iPhone may all be crafted out of aluminum, but that doesn’t mean you should expect the same things from all of them. The main reason is that we’re not talking about pure elemental aluminum, but various aluminum alloys: mixtures of aluminum with other trace elements in order to modify its physical and chemical properties. Some may be harder, while others softer and easier to machine. Now a new rumor claims that Apple could be thinking about changing-up which aluminum alloys it uses for its products in an effort to make the next iPhone more durable.

Specifically, the rumor concerns the 7000-class aluminum alloy Apple’s employing for the body of the Apple Watch Sport. Alloys in the 7000 series have a high concentration of zinc and can be hardened to become stronger than many other common alloys. That’s great for the Apple Watch, but this rumor claims that Apple could also move to the same type of aluminum for the next iPhone.

Even if last year’s “bendgate” phenomenon was overblown, the move to a more robust aluminum alloy could certainly go a long way towards avoiding a similar scandal in the future. For the moment, this rumor doesn’t have a ton of external support, but it’s a sensible enough idea, especially considering Apple’s recent work with the alloy for its smartwatch.

Source: Economic Daily News (Google Translate)
Via: MacRumors

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!