Dream of Apple Watch Sport Band swapping falls apart

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The Apple Watch is expensive, any way you slice it, so it’s no surprise to learn that customers are looking to get the most out of their smartwatch-buying dollar. If you’re trying to save a buck, you may already be considering a Watch or Watch Sport with the rubber Sport Band, the most affordable strap option. For a moment it seemed like there might be a way to get even more value out of the Sport Band, but those plans are now finding themselves going up in smoke.

Here was the intent: it may have caught your eye that Apple’s advertising that these models come with two straps in the box, one for smaller, and one for larger wrists. Initially it sounded like users would be able to privately trade those extra bands – trading with someone with a different wrist size and band color, so that you both end up with two color options that are just your size. As it turns out, that no longer seems like it’s going to work.

The problem is that instead of two complete Sport Bands, the Apple Watch appears that it will ship with more like one-and-a-half. That is, you’ll get one “top” band with the securing pin, and two differently sized “bottom” straps of varying lengths. While those allow you to swap out the bottom in order to adjust sizing, it also means that you don’t have a spare complete band to trade with someone else.

So if you do want a second color option, that’s going to mean shelling out an extra $50.

Source: TechCrunch

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!