Google Pony Express tipped to help manage, pay bills straight from Gmail

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Google’s always looking for ways to make your life simpler, pulling data from one place in order to provide you with useful information somewhere else. Last spring we saw evidence of just such a feature in the works for Google Now, scouring your inbox for bills and presenting you with notifications for when they needed to be paid. To hear a new report, Google’s still very much interested in helping us cut through some of the headache surrounding bill payment and is planning to introduce a new system later this year to make bill organization and payment a breeze, all from within Gmail.

The system’s called Pony Express (codename or not, we don’t yet know), and it would provide a unified bill payment framework for Gmail. Users would first have to jump through some hoops to identify themselves to the satisfaction of Google’s financial institution partners, before Pony Express could start doing its thing. The service would group your bills, help you manage pay-by dates, and ultimately submit your payments. For creditors without online payment options, Google could use a third party to print and mail out checks on your behalf.

Advanced features look like they’ll include bill sharing, convenient for when you’re splitting the cost of something with a friend, as well as the ability to access funds directly from a bank account, rather than the card-based payment options currently available through Google Wallet.

Pony Express is reportedly in the works to go live sometime in the fourth quarter.

Source: Re/code
Via: Android and Me

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!