Samsung brings 14nm fabrication to Exynos SoCs

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We first learned of Samsung’s Exynos 5433 SoC last summer, the 64-bit octa-core processor that would end up powering the Galaxy Note 4. Why that originally looked like it might land under the umbrella of the Exynos 5 lineup, last fall Samsung formally designated it as the first Exynos 7 chip. While a very capable chip in its own right, Samsung’s already looking to give the Exynos 7 Octa a little boost, and today announced that it’s beginning mass fabrication under a new 14nm process.

The existing Exynos 7 Octa in the Note 4 is a 20nm chip, just like the Exynos 5 Octa you’ll find in the Galaxy Alpha. By moving to a 14nm process, Samsung hopes to deliver chips capable of 20 percent faster operation, while consuming up to 35 percent less power.

The Exynos 7 Octa won’t be the only chip Samsung makes with 14nm FinFET tech, but it’s sure going to be the first. With Samsung announcing mass production like it is now, the timing sure sounds prime for this 14nm Exynos 7 Octa ending up in the soon-to-be-launched Galaxy S6. Rumors we’ve heard of a late-March start to sales suggest that Samsung could be eager to follow an MWC launch announcement with retail availability just a few weeks later, and while that might mean a hectic turnaround to get these chips into those phones lickety-split, it’s well within the realm of possibility.

Source: Samsung
Via: GSM Arena

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck

Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen’s first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he’s convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he’s not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bits

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