HTC One M7 Lollipop update confirmed for tomorrow (and in the US, no less)

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Well this is an unexpected treat: late last week, HTC fessed-up to missing its own 90-day promise on getting Lollipop updates out for the HTC One M7 and M8. We had already seen solid progress on bringing Lollipop to the One M8 in nations around the world, but the US was still waiting. For the One M7, the situation looked far worse, with little outward evidence of progress towards a public release. So while we were optimistic that the One M8 might complete its Lollipop roll-out soon, we were resigned to waiting a bit longer for the M7’s update. So imagine our surprise with HTC’s Mo Versi announced this afternoon that Sprint users are about to see a One M7 Lollipop update (5.0.1) start heading out OTA tomorrow.

Usually we see such updates start abroad before eventually making their way through the sluggish US carrier customization and approval process, so it’s amazing to hear that Sprint could be the first to get access.

Interestingly, despite Versi’s announcement, HTC’s own software update tracker still insists that work on the M7’s Lollipop update is still in its earliest development stage, not even to the integration phase yet. We’re hoping that means that the tracker just hasn’t been refreshed, because as of now there’s no further evidence to suggest that Versi could have made a typo.

Check back with us tomorrow as we learn whether or not this update heads out on schedule, as well as if HTC’s got any other news about progress on M7 Lollipop updates for non-Sprint users.

Source: Mo Versi (Twitter)
Via: Phone Dog

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck

Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen’s first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he’s convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he’s not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bits

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