Alcatel Onetouch delivers Hero 2 six-inch stylus-equipped phablet

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After new devices today from Microsoft, HTC, Huawei, and more, it’s now Alcatel Onetouch’s turn to start showcasing some hardware of its own, and it’s getting us started with its latest phablet, the six-inch Hero 2.

The Hero 2 features a six-inch 1080p display, runs a 2GHz octa-core SoC, and has a 13.1MP main camera with 5MP front-facer. There’s only one 16GB storage option, but that’s user-expandable via microSD. The phone packs 2GB of RAM, has a 3100mAh batter, and will arrive running Android 4.4.

So what’s so notable about this guy? Alcatel Onetouch points out the expansive display, filling 90 percent of the handset’s face for an “edge-to-edge” look. The company’s also quite proud of the phone’s light weight despite its size and metal construction, weighing-in at just 175g – that barely slides-in under the Note 4’s 176g.

Like the first Hero, the Hero 2’s got its own stylus, tucking away for storage right into the phablet itself. Unfortunately, this looks to be another capacitive offering, so you shouldn’t expect quite the same level of functionality and precision you’d get from something like the S Pen.

In addition to the return of optional accessories like the light-up MagicFlip LED cover, the Hero 2 will see the arrival of some new ones, such as the MagicFlip DJ with integrated mixing controls. Sales of the Hero 2 are set to begin later this month.

Source: Alcatel Onetouch

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!