Huawei says Tizen has “no chance to be successful”

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Tizen just can’t seem to get off the ground when it comes to smartphones. Sure, Samsung’s put the platform inside its consumer electronics, and the OS powers the majority of the company’s smartwatches, but a Tizen smartphone continues to elude us. Sure, we saw the Samsung Z go official a couple months back, but the phone’s been hit with delay after delay since then, and now it’s anyone’s guess when (or if) sales might actually begin. Keep in mind, though, while it may seem like Samsung’s baby, Tizen is actually an effort from multiple companies; could any other players be working on Tizen phones of their own? Well, don’t count on any from Huawei, as company exec Richard Yu had some pretty harsh things to say about the OS in a recent Wall Street Journal interview.

While Yu admits that carriers are interested in seeing Tizen phones from various manufacturers, he’s clear that the platform is simply a non-starter for Huawei. Even though the company looked into the possibility in the past, it determined that Tizen doesn’t even have a chance at success, and instead decided to place its focus squarely on Android.

That also means turning away from Windows Phone, which Huawei had dabbled with in the past. While Yu is a little more kind towards this platform (saying WP at least has the possibility for success, albeit difficult to achieve), he explains that it’s never been a money-maker for Huawei, so the company is putting any further WP efforts on hold.

As for the possibility of going out on its own with a Huawei-exclusive platform, Yu says nothing like that’s happening either. His words sound like advice that Samsung might want to take to heart: “It’s easy to design a new OS, but the problem is building the ecosystem around it.” Ain’t that the truth?

Source: The Wall Street Journal
Via: Engadget

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!