New Motorola Skip swaps NFC for Bluetooth, FCC reveals

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Last year, with the launch of the Moto X, Motorola introduced its Skip NFC accessory. The little tag could be used to quickly unlock the smartphone, although our hands-on found Skip a little awkward to use. With the Moto X+1 expected for next week, will Skip once again be a featured accessory? A new leak FCC publication suggest that Motorola’s been cooking-up a totally redesigned second-generation Skip, and this one adds a bunch of new features by way of bringing Bluetooth support to the device.

While the first Skip was an entirely passive NFC tag, the new Skip would be a battery-powered Bluetooth fob, lasting for over a year on its non-rechargeable (but replaceable) lithium battery. The Bluetooth connectivity would allow you to unlock your phone via Skip’s proximity, like a longer-distance version of the first gen model’s functionality, as well as providing a button to help you find a misplaced phone. That would work the other way around too, using your phone to make Skip start beeping, so you could track it down.

The leaked manual makes it clear that this won’t be a Moto X+1, or even a Motorola exclusive, and Androids of all sorts – so long as they’re running 4.3 or later – will be able to install the Skip app and interact with the accessory. There’s no word yet on pricing, nor even about specific launch plans, but with that September 4 event coming up, the new Skip’s debut could be just around the corner.

Update: Now with a link to the manual courtesy of the FCC, as well as some pics of the hardware itself.

moto-skip-fcc

Source: Droid Life

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!