Early September Moto 360 availability hinted at by Google I/O follow-ups

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With those invitations Motorola just started distributing for a September 4 event, the ones that pretty unambiguously feature an image of a watch among their highlighted products, it’s safe to say that we’re just about to learn of the start of retail sales for the Moto 360. But even if that announcement comes at the event, when might the smartwatch actually go up for sale? After all, a couple of the other products we’re hoping to see announced – the Moto X+1 and G2 – have been rumored to land on September 25, and September 10, respectively. Would the 360 fall closer to the former or the latter? A new clue has just arrived, as Google gets in touch with people who attended I/O back in June about the 360s they’ve got coming to them.

Google I/O 2014 attendees walked away with cool stuff like Google Cardboard and a LG or Samsung Android Wear watch, but the big draw – the Moto 360 – wasn’t yet available. Devs who attended would still be getting a 360, but it was a matter of waiting until the hardware was ready to start heading out. Today, Google has begun contacting I/O attendees with news that their 360s are nearly ready to go, and asking for their shipping details.

The pertinent bit from this message is the deadline Google gives: devs only have until September 5 to respond with shipping info. While not an absolute lock, the proximity of that date to the September 4 event sure has us feeling like 360 sales could begin, if not that very same week, then perhaps early the next.

Source: Android Police

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!