Moto 360 battery life could push past two days

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The idea of a smartwatch can seem so alluring: access to messages, searches, calendars, and notifications, all without having to pull your phone out of your pocket. But actually using a wearable isn’t without some very real compromises, and few of those are more palpable than limited battery life. Looking at the first wave of Android Wear devices, we were lucky to get a solid day of use out of either. Expectations are high for Motorola do to a lot better with the Moto 360, and the wireless charging the watch is set to employ could well make the recharging experience a very convenient one. But just how long will the battery last? A new hands-on report suggests quite long, indeed, and places the 360’s battery life well beyond that of its competition.

According to this account, the Moto 360 beats the LG G Watch’s battery life by a factor of two-and-a-half.

Technically, a battery life that’s “two and a half times better” than the one-day life on the G Watch would last 3.5 days on a charge (1 + 2.5 more), but we kind of get the impression from this account that the author meant to say “a battery life that’s two-and-a-half times that of the G Watch” (rather than “better”) for 2.5 days total. In either case, it sounds like you’re going to be able to forget about charging the 360 overnight and still have it get through a solid second day of operation, no problem.

Between wireless charging and this healthy battery life, are any of you nay-sayers starting to feel a little more amenable to picking up a smartwatch?

Source: Mister Gadget (Google Translate)
Via: Phone Arena

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!