AT&T picks up the LG G Vista phablet – but now it’s 720p

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Right now, if you mention “LG” and “phablet,” we’re liable to start thinking about that G3 Stylus LG seems to have accidentally outed earlier this week. At least, it’s going to have an integrated stylus, but the jury’s still out on a number of other hardware specs, including a precise screen size. But wind the clock back just a little further, and we had a much more straightforward LG phablet on our mind, the 5.7-inch G Vista that launched last month. Right from the start, rumors identified the phone as a Verizon model, and by the time it was finally read to go official at the end of July, sure enough, it was Verizon announcing the start of sales. Today, we see the G Vista start to spread its wings, as AT&T invites the smartphone to join its lineup.

The weird thing, though, is that this isn’t the same G Vista Verizon got – and we’re not just talking band support and obnoxious Verizon logo placement, either. In the weeks leading up to the model’s launch, we got a lot of conflicting info about the phablet’s resolution, hearing both qHD and 720p from various sources. While the Verizon G Vista arrived with a quarter HD display, AT&T’s version packs a 5.7-inch 720p screen – a small, but appreciated upgrade. We’re still looking at specs like a 1.2GHz quad-core SoC and 1.5GB of RAM, so this is far from a flagship model, but moving from around 190ppi to nearly 260ppi is improvement enough for us.

The price isn’t bad either, with the G Vista running just $355 off-contract. Sales begin on August 22, and the phablet qualifies for that essentially-free G Pad 7.0 offer if you’re buying the phone with a service agreement.

Source: AT&T

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!