Consumer interest in the Amazon Fire Phone sounds dismal

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Amazon’s Fire Phone should have a lot going for it: it was created by one of the biggest retailers in the US, giving it fantastic exposure, it’s got some solid hardware and well-executed software features, and the OS  itself is refreshingly pleasant to navigate through. But then crap like the bad battery life, forgettable camera, lack of Google apps, and way-too-ambitious price tag managed to turn us away. Even if we weren’t digging the phone, would the average consumer find reason to buy this handset? One month back, we looked at some troubling pre-release sales figures, and now a new analyst report seems to reinforce the notion that public interest in the Fire Phone simply isn’t there.

A survey of 1000 potential smartphone shoppers gauged their interest in various platforms and manufacturers. Unsurprisingly, the iPhone fared quite well, with Android not too far behind. But it’s on the lower end of the spectrum where things get interesting, like how lingering BlackBerry loyalty (6.8 percent of respondents saying they’d buy a BB phone) exceeded Windows Phone interest (5.3 percent).

And the Fire Phone? Only five percent of participants in the survey expressed an interest in the Amazon smartphone. That doesn’t necessarily mean the phone is doomed – as a retailer the size it is, Amazon has a near unparalleled opportunity to convince shoppers that this is the phone they want. So far, it may be struggling to do that, but perhaps a new campaign might help turn things around.

Source: BGR

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!