Verizon starts experimenting with new approach to bloatware

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You think you’re being so smart about buying a new smartphone: you consider long and hard just which features you really need, and go in ready to purchase a phone that’s neither underpowered, nor would result in you throwing money away on extras you won’t use. And while that 16GB of storage sounded perfect on paper, you power-on your phone for the first time only to discover that nearly half of that space is occupied by pre-installed software. You just became the latest victim of bloat. Over the years, some carriers and OEMs have been better than others about not dragging-down your phone with tons of apps you don’t want, and tonight we learn about something new Verizon is trying that just might make the situation a little nicer for its users.

Starting with its version of the LG G3, instead of delivering phones with all this bloat pre-installed, Verizon is instead configuring them to automatically download and install certain apps in the background, during the phone’s setup process. The data used to do so doesn’t count against plan allowances, and the process should be largely transparent to the end user.

What difference does that make? Well, in contrast to some traditionally pre-installed bloat apps, ones installed via this new process are intended to be fully removable by the user: not just disappearing from your app drawer when you don’t want them, but the data deleted from phone storage entirely.

That sounds pretty nice, but it’s not clear yet just how well that’s going to work in practice – testing with the G3 reveals a mixed bag of success, with some apps refusing to remove themselves entirely. That seems to defeat the point of this new practice, but perhaps Verizon is still working out the kinks.

Source: Droid Life

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!