Galaxy Note 4 may warn users of sun skin damage risk

Advertisement

Over the past few months, we’ve slowly been putting together the picture of what to expect from the Samsung Galaxy Note 4’s hardware. Will it feature a quad HD display? Will it have some sort of wrap-around screen? One detail that arrived about a month back was that the phablet might include a UV light sensor on its face, but the rumor wasn’t accompanied by any insight into just how that sensor might be used. Now a new leak helps spell out just what Samsung’s up to, describing a warning system to protect users against skin damage.

Reportedly, the Samsung S Health app will use that UV sensor data to calculate the current UV index and warn the user of appropriate steps that should be taken to minimize risk, including the use of sunscreen, protective clothing, and limiting exposure time. That’s not a big surprise, considering the few other obvious uses for a UV sensor, but this leaked app info help confirm Samsung’s intentions. The app should additionally offer users informative facts about UV radiation and try to bust some long-standing myths.

We’ve also heard that Apple’s iWatch may pack a UV sensor of its own, causing us to wonder if this is about to hit a critical mass where it suddenly becomes a default sensor on a whole bunch of upcoming devices. For as beneficial as UV warnings sound, though, the practical use of such sensors may still need some fine-tuning, and this leak warns that the Note 4’s sensor will only function within a specific range of angles in relation the sun’s position in the sky.

Source: SamMobile

Advertisement

What's your reaction?
Love It
0%
Like It
0%
Want It
0%
Had It
0%
Hated It
0%
About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!