Apple’s iWatch could arrive a little later than expected

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Looking forward to Apple’s iWatch? Sure, just you and a couple billion other iOS fans who have so far been eyeing all this Android Wear business this summer with thoughts of “just wait; you’ll see.” And based on the rumors we’ve heard so far, the iWatch really is shaping up to be a force to be reckoned with, not just with some very premium hardware but also deep OS-level integration with Apple’s other mobile devices. We’ve been hoping to see the iWatch arrive sometime this fall, with reports leaning towards availability maybe sometime in October, following production hitting full-blast in September. The latest word, however, suggests we may have a longer wait in store, with the iWatch not coming out until later on in the year.

That’s what one analyst is saying anyway, and while he previously was a proponent of those September production rumors, further understanding of the technical challenges Apple is expected to face with this high-end piece of smartwatch hardware – as well as a need for additional software refinement – is forcing him to reconsider that schedule. Instead of September, iWatch production may not happen until November.

In that case, while we might still get the iWatch in time for the holiday season, it could be a seriously late arrival. A timetable like this may also force Apple to break up its fall announcements, distancing the introduction of new phone and tablet hardware from its first smartwatch offering.

Source: MacRumors
Via: BGR

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!