Project Tango commercial release set to arrive next year

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A few months back Google revealed one of the latest ambitious projects from its Advanced Technology and Project group, the sensor-packed Project Tango. Tango’s designed to let a device accurately scan its surroundings and determine its location in 3D space, allowing it to form a complete 3D map of its environment. First Google made available an experimental Tango handset to interested developers, and we just saw it follow that up with a very high-end (not to mention expensive) Tango tablet. But how long is this going to remain a curiosity for devs, and when might it mature into a more consumer-focused model? Today at I/O, Google brought some answers.

Google says that it’s working with LG to make a commercial Project Tango device happen, and that the first release should take place early next year. While we’ll likely see both phones and tablets, the earliest model, at least, is supposed to be another tablet – and hopefully one with a price tag south of $1000 this time around. We’re still a little far out to get a more precise release timetable, nor any firm pricing info, but it’s still pretty cool to know this is happening.

But what will you do with a Tango device? The tech sure sounds impressive, but what are its real-world uses? Gaming might actually be an important part of how this hardware is eventually launched, and the advanced sensors could allow for much more precise motion-based controls than we enjoy today. But there’s still a lot of time between now and next year for devs to come up with plenty of other uses for Tango and its sensors, so even if gaming’s not your bag, Tango should still find a way to impress.

Source: Google
Via: TechCrunch

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!