Motorola fixing cracked Moto X screens for free (even if it doesn’t have to)

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HTC announced a pretty fabulous program back in February with the introduction of HTC Advantage. The stuff about Android updates and HTC Backup was good news on its own, but the really stand-out feature was how HTC committed to giving owners of One-series devices one free screen replacement for any damage taken during the first six months of ownership – even if that cracked screen was your own fault. Sure, companies like Apple had offered screen-replacement services before, but those have been optional plans smartphone owners had to pay separately for. Now it’s emerging that a similar (if not even slightly better) offer is available from Motorola for the Moto X, even if the company isn’t going out of its way to advertise it.

Following the arrival of reports of Moto X owners getting Motorola to replace handsets with cracked screens as part of the company’s warranty service, Android Police reached out to Motorola for clarification of its policies. While the text of its official support policy clearly states that repair costs “may be incurred for out of warranty, or devices that display liquid or physical damage,” a spokesperson confirmed that the unwritten (but apparently nonetheless official) rule is “we do offer a one-time free repair or replacement for broken displays on Moto Xs.”

We’re not saying that you should go out and start treating your Moto X super-roughly with the expectation that Motorola will replace a damaged screen for free (and keep in mind, the written, legally binding policy explicitly clears the manufacturer from responsibility in the case of physical damage), but should your Moto X suffer an unexpected accident – well, perhaps this news will help stem the panic you might otherwise find yourself facing.

Source: Android Police

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!