Google Glass may be ready to make international debut

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Sales of Google Glass feel like they’re approaching a crossroads. Google’s removed the initial exclusivity from its Glass Explorer program, opening sales to any eligible shopper with $1500 to spend. We’ve been wondering if Google could finally be ready to move Glass forward into its next phase, targeting even broader audiences with a lower price. It’s still unclear just when, how, (or hell, if) that might happen, but a new rumor has arrived to offer another stab at what Google could be up to for its next big Glass expansion, finally bringing the headset to users abroad.

Our mention of “eligible shoppers” a moment ago concerns the current limitations on Glass orders: you need be 18, and you need to reside in the United States. But according to some unnamed sources, Google could be planning an announcement for I/O 2014 later this month that would confirm the start of Glass sales to shoppers in additional countries.

Unfortunately, there’s no big list of just who would get access to Glass through this move, with only the UK mentioned specifically. Other English-speaking nations may also make the cut, and there are hints in Glass firmware that point to possible Japanese support – but all that’s mostly guesswork.

Still, even without the details this could be big news for Glass; we know how much it can suck for Android fans abroad to see Google giving the US preferential treatment, and your chance to have the opportunity to check out Glass for yourselves is long overdue.

Source: Phandroid

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!