Samsung goes official with giant seven-inch Galaxy W phablet

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Last year we saw Samsung push phablet sizes outside their comfort zone with the launch of its Galaxy Mega series, introducing both a 5.8-inch and 6.3-inch model. But lately we’ve been tracking an even larger device, and last month we were looking at the seven-inch Samsung SM-T2558. Last week it stopped by the FCC before we got a leaked render to check out. We were wondering if this guy might go public at Samsung’s tablet even next week, where we expect to see the Tab S models debut. Instead, Samsung has jumped the gun, and gone ahead with the launch of the seven-inch Galaxy W (no, not that one) for South Korea.

At least, that’s the only market we’ve heard mentioned for the Galaxy W so far, but we wouldn’t be surprised to learn of plans for availability elsewhere. Specs attached to the hardware largely match what we’ve heard already, including a 720p display, 1.2GHz quad-core SoC (possibly Snapdragon 400), 1.5GB RAM, 16GB storage, 8MP main camera with 2MP front-facer, and a 3200mAh battery. Oddly, the phablet (if we can still call it that) will ship running Android 4.3, rather than a more recent KitKat build.

And as you can see from the pics Samsung’s provided: yes, the manufacturer very much expects people to use this giant-sized handset as a phone. The Galaxy W will be available in black, white, and red color options as it goes up for sale in South Korea for what works out to about $490.

galaxy-w-2Source: Samsung (Google Translate)
Via: SammyHub

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!