No more “Made in the USA” for Motorola: do you care? (Poll)

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Motorola just announced that its short-lived effort to assemble smartphones in the United States is drawing to a close, with plans to shutter the Fort Worth plant that put together the Moto X before the end of the year. Motorola had big dreams for this project, not just bringing more tech jobs to the States, but helping to speed distribution of the sort of custom orders possible with all of Moto Maker’s options. Unfortunately, the project’s just been too expensive to maintain, and Moto X production will shift to Motorola’s facilities abroad – even though Moto Maker customizations will continue to be offered.

When Motorola was first promoting the Moto X, this “homemade in the USA” angle was a pretty big deal. We saw the company release those big teasers a month before the phone’s launch where it invited us to “imagine what will be possible when you have the world’s best design, engineering, and manufacturing talent located here in the USA,” timed to fall right around Independence Day and all the patriotism that goes along with it.

But now that we’re losing that whole component of Motorola’s smartphone business, does that change how you feel about the company and its products any? Are you feeling less inclined to consider this rumored X+1? Or were you never really too concerned with the idea of American assembly to begin with? We’re curious to find out, so let your feelings be known in the poll below.


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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!