Toshiba intros trio of budget-priced Android and Windows tablets

Advertisement

The last time we had the opportunity to talk to you about a Toshiba tablet, we were looking at the eight-inch Encore running Windows 8 late last summer. At $330, it was already a pretty affordable tablet, but even that low price isn’t low enough for Toshiba. Today we see the company introduce not just two new Windows tablets that manage to outdo the Encore when it comes to affordability, but also an Android model with an extremely low price of its own.

On the Windows side of the fence we get the two new Encore 2 tablets, an 8-inch and 10-inch model. Both run quad-core Atoms, and both have relatively low-res 1280 x 800 displays – nothing incredibly exciting there, and not a big step forward from the original Encore… until we get to pricing. Instead of $330 for the 8-incher, the new Encore 2 will sell for just $200. Even moving up to the 10-inch version only raises that price to $270.

Over in Android-land, the prices dip even lower. The new Excite Go is a 7-inch tablet with a 1024 x 600 screen, quad-core Atom SoC, and 16GB storage with the option for microSD expansion. Again, far from stellar specs, but with a price tag that just might make up for that: the Excite Go will sell for a scant $110. Can you pay more and also get more from other tablets? Absolutely, but if price is your main limitation, we can think of worse options.

Look for sales of all three tablets to begin sometime in July.

toshiba-excite-goSource: Engadget

Advertisement

What's your reaction?
Love It
0%
Like It
0%
Want It
0%
Had It
0%
Hated It
0%
About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!