Galaxy Note 4 software features could include a couple HTC knock-offs

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At this point of the year, when it comes to thinking about upcoming Samsung flagships we’re usually looking squarely at the next Note model, but these rumors of a Galaxy S5 Prime have really been getting in the way of the Note’s spotlight. Still, we’ve had a few opportunities to talk about the phablet that will be the Note 4, and earlier this week we heard a bit about a possible screen size. Today we change focus and consider the phone’s software as a new rumor attempts to detail a few features Samsung could be preparing for the Note 4.

We hear about four modes in particular: Swipe to launch Motion Launcher, Aqua Capture, Multi Network for Booster, and Smart Fingerprint. Right away, a few of those should sound familiar: Aqua Capture harkens to Aqua Mode on Active models, and sure seems to imply the presence of waterproofing. And Multi Network for Booster recalls the Download Booster on the GS5 we saw so many carriers fight back against. While the names may change, we’re probably looking at largely similar functionality.

Smart Fingerprint is speculated to be a way to use the phablet’s fingerprint scanner to perform specific tasks, launching apps based on which finger you scan. That’s something we’ve seen before, with the HTC One Max. Motion Launcher may also take some inspiration from HTC, or at least we’d assume as much from how much it sounds like Motion Launch on the One M8. Hopefully, Samsung can make things work a little better than HTC did, as we found ourselves let down by the inconsistent performance of the feature.

Source: SamMobile

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!