Google expands Play Store payment options: PayPal, new countries

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Google’s Play Store gives so many of us a seamless app-purchasing experience that it’s easy to take the convenience for granted: we tie a credit card to our accounts, and we’re off, ready to purchase away. But things aren’t so easy everywhere, especially if you don’t have a credit card you can use for such purposes. Today we learn about some steps Google is taking to make Play Store purchases even more accessible, implementing new payment methods and bringing existing ones to new users.

Starting today, you can complete Play Store payments via PayPal. Just enter your account details when prompted, and your payment will go right though the Play Store app. All told, this feature is going live for users in twelve nations: Austria, Belgium, Canada, Finland, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, the United States, and the United Kingdom.

If PayPal’s not your thing, Google’s also expanding support for carrier billing, where your app purchases show up on your monthly cellular service invoice. The full list of supported countries is a little long to get into here, but today seven new ones get added, including Singapore, Thailand, and Taiwan. Additionally, Google is bringing Play Store gift card support to more nations, like Japan and Germany.

While that’s it for the user side, Google is also expanding developer access to the Play Store, letting devs in Indonesia, Malaysia, and Turkey start selling apps, while also adding support for additional currencies.

Source: Google
Via: Android Police

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!