That MediaTek-powered Nexus sounding more appealing after latest hardware rumors

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One week back we heard a pretty interesting rumor about Google’s possible plans for a future Nexus phone, one that would reach new heights (or should that be lows?) of affordability by selling for a mere $100. While the report was quite light on hardware details that might explain how the phone could be provided at such a low price point, it did name one: the use of a MediaTek processor. That on its own is enough to get Android fans groaning, either due to the reputation of the company’s products as lesser alternatives to even lower-end Snapdragon chips, or as so many of you pointed out in the comments, the company’s antagonistic relationship with devs and refusal to provide source code. While some of those concerns remain, today we hear a little about which specific MediaTek chip this super-cheap Nexus might use, and it’s enough to get us feeling slightly better about the whole idea.

Back at the Mobile World Congress, MediaTek introduced its MT6732 SoC, a quad-core 1.5GHz chip with Mali-T760 GPU. So what, you ask? Because it uses 64-bit Cortex-A53 cores, that’s why. MediaTek says the chip is intended for the “super-mid” market, and that sounds like just what a $100 Nexus phone might be going for.

Even better, if we don’t get the MT6732, rumors also suggest the MT6752 could be in the running. This guy takes everything the MT6732 does (it’s even pin-compatible) and dials it up a notch, with eight 64-bit cores running at 2GHz.

Don’t get us wrong – there’s still a lot that we need to learn about these plans (and that’s assuming that there’s any legitimacy to them at all), but the idea of a 64-bit Nexus is pretty interesting, and we’ll be curious to see where this thread leads.

Source: UDN (Microsoft Translator)
Via: phoneArena

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!