NVIDIA Shield 2 hardware might just get 4GB of RAM

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About a month back, we started getting the sense that NVIDIA was cleaning house in preparation for a second generation Shield portable gaming console, knocking the price on existing units down to $200. But if there really is a new Shield just around the corner, what might we be able to expect from the model? We’ve already shared with you some of our thoughts on how NVIDIA can capture gamers’ interest with a Shield 2, but today we get our first taste of hardware specifics, with some benchmark data revealing some pretty compelling specs for the handheld.

According to this AnTuTu data, gone is the Tegra 4 (naturally), replaced by a new Tegra K1. We’re still waiting to get a chance to try out some of that silicon for ourselves, but early reports indicate the K1 should be a force to be reckoned with.

Screen resolution should get a meager bump, moving up from 720p to an unusual 1440 x 900 panel, and we could even see the arrival of a low-res camera (for in-game chat, perhaps). But the most interesting part of this find is the reported RAM: 4GB’s worth.

While it’s only a matter of time before an Android device arrives with that kind of memory, it’s decidedly odd to think about a product like Shield heralding that new age. After all, a gaming console is often laser-focused on one task – the game currently running – and wouldn’t really benefit from how extra RAM might serve to improve multitasking. The only thing we can think of is that NVIDIA may have an interest in promoting Shield-specific titles with healthy memory appetites, but so far we haven’t seen any sign of such software.

Source: AnTuTu (Google Translate)
Via: phoneArena

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!