Google prepping apps for Android 4.4.3 – so where is it?

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Last week, it finally looked like we were going to see Google release Android 4.4.3. We’d been following work on the update as evidence of its existence popped up here and there, but last Monday really upped the stakes as Sprint advised its subscribers that a Nexus 5 update was incoming – and one that sure seemed to be Android 4.4.3. We waited to see Google confirm the news with its announcement of the update, but that never came. By Friday, even Sprint had reversed course and removed all mention of the update from its server. What gives? Well, Android 4.4.3’s release may have hit a little snag, but Google continues to let us know that it’s coming, and our latest evidence comes in the form of a Google app update.

This one actually dates back to last week as well, but as a relatively low profile app, it flew in under the radar: Google Edu Device Setup. This is the app admins use alongside Google Play for Education, and in an update released last Wednesday, Google mentions in the changelog “support for Android 4.4.3 and non-Nexus Tablets.”

If you had any doubt that Google was nearly ready to announce Android 4.4.3 itself, and wondered if last week’s incident was merely a matter of Sprint getting its timing wrong, this should help spell it out for you that devs within Google may have also been expecting 4.4.3 to go live mid-last-week.

When it arrives now, we can’t say with much certainty, but Android 4.4.3 really feels like it’s just on the tip of Google’s tongue.

Source: Google Play Store
Via: Android Central

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!