T-Mobile launches new $40 plan for people who still care about voice calls

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T-Mobile has been finding a lot of success in the US with its no-annual-contract alternatives to service from some of the other major carriers, potentially saving users a fair deal of money in the process. This week the company is rolling out its latest series of “un-carrier” announcements, and today’s is the news of an affordable $40 Simple Starter plan with unlimited talk and text, alongside 500MB of 4G data. Is it a smart deal, though?

$40 is certainly a lot less than you might pay at other carriers, but there are two big problems we see with this plan. One was pointed out by BGR, after noticing some changes to the language T-Mobile uses on its site to describe the details behind this offer. Unlike other T-Mobile plans with data allotments that dial your speeds down once you hit your limit, this one appears to cut you off from data altogether once that 500MB point is reached. Want more data than that, and you’d presumably have to pay up.

Our other concern is that this doesn’t sound like a very good deal unless you specifically need to be using voice calls a whole bunch, something that many of us are doing less and less of these days. That’s because T-Mobile still has that fantastic $30 pre-paid plan with unlimited text, 5GB data (and this time, data that slows down – not goes away entirely – once you hit the limit), and 100 voice minutes. If you only find yourself on voice calls for a few minutes a day, that $30 5GB option seems far superior to the new $40 500MB offering.

Source: T-Mobile, BGR

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!