Windows Phone to start flirting with super-thin handsets?

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As smartphone races go, the battle to be thinnest around has (thankfully!) fizzled. Sure, a few OEMs try to push limits every now and then, but most of the big names are pretty comfortable around the sizes their flagship inhabit now, and show little interest in defying physics and trying to cram even more hardware into smaller spaces. Still, it is neat to know that there are at least some crazy thin options out there if that’s your cup of tea, and a new rumor suggest that Windows Phone could soon get a seriously thin option of its own.

While we haven’t heard it mentioned among the list of official Windows Phone partners, the number of OEMs signed-up has been exploding in recent months, so we’re not going to discount this theory just based on that. Supposedly, the Chinese OEM Neo may introduce a Windows Phone version of its upcoming M1 Android, with the same 5.9mm-thick build.

Assuming the rest of the hardware stays in place, the phone would offer a five-inch 720p display, 1GB of RAM, 8GB storage, a 13-megapixel Sony camera, and be powered by a MediaTek SoC. That might be another red flag, since we haven’t seen any MediaTek-based Windows Phone models to date, but the company expressed general interest in the platform earlier this year.

In the end, we’re very much on the fence about this rumor. There are a couple points against it, but at the same time this is a period of new, untested waters for Microsoft and its smartphone platform, and perhaps we should be easing our expectations to allow for a little more wiggle room.

Regardless of whether or not this is likely to happen, what do you think of the news? Does a 6mm-thick Windows Phone model appeal to you, or do you prefer the more solid feel of thicker phones?

Source: Gizmochina
Via: WMPoweruser

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!