Motorola joins the “powered by Android” club with boot animation updates

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Last week, we started hearing claims that Google was instituting a new boot logo mandate, requiring Andorid OEMs to feature a “powered by Android” message while their phones powered on. Certainly, we’d seen such messages on recent hardware like the HTC One M8 and Galaxy S5, and the leaked design document specifying how OEMs were to implement the logo sure made it seem that Google was serious about it. We still haven’t managed to confirm that this is absolutely something Google is forcing on manufacturers who want to ship their phones loaded with Google apps, but the evidence continues to grow in favor of that theory. The latest place we’re seeing the message spread is over to Motorola devices, as the company releases an updated Boot Services app.

This being April Fools’ Day, we’re going to be hard-pressed to steer clear of all the goofs and hoaxes being perpetuated upon the internet, and this bit of news is no exception: with the updated Motorola Boot Services in place, Moto X and Moto G users will see their boot logos overtaken by a variety of cryptozoologic creatures; don’t count on any of those lasting too long, though.

But as to the serious note here, that “powered by Android” message is now in play. This is an interesting development, as earlier reports made it sound like this would only be a requirement for future devices. Is Motorola just going out of its way to stay on Google’s good side? We can’t say for sure just yet, but it’s definitely looking like we were right on the money when we advised you last week, “you’ll be seeing this logo a whole lot in the future.”

Source: Android Central

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!