Nokia’s WP8.1 firmware might just be “Cherry Blossom Pink”

Advertisement

First we had Nokia’s Amber update for the firmware of its WP8 smartphones, arriving alongside Microsoft’s GDR2 update. Later we heard about Bittersweet Shimmer (yeah, that’s apparently a color) for GDR3, but the software we ultimately got was simply called Black – still a color, at least, and seemingly keeping with an alphabetical procession. So what would be next? A rumor earlier this week talked about it being Blue, but that sounded kind of weird. After all, Blue was a name used to refer to WP8.1 itself, and while technically it would come after Black, we were expecting a color beginning with C. Today we finally learn what that new color might be, with a leak revealing Nokia’s Cherry Blossom Pink software.

Some screenshots of WP8.1 accompany this news, but with 8.1 itself still being largely unfamiliar to us (in spite of the numerous leaks), they’re of limited use; how to tell where the 8.1 stuff ends and the CBP stuff begins? Still, we’ve provided a few below, and once again we get to check out 8.1’s ability to throw up a background image behind your Live Tiles.

There’s also a solid chance that we could be looking at a repeat of that situation with Black and Bittersweet Shimmer, and while Cherry Blossom Pink may be what Nokia is calling this internally, it could elect to go with a much more concise name for the public release. Honestly, even Blue might still be on the table. It’s no certainty, but we may well get our answer at Nokia’s April 2 event.

cbp-shotsSource: Sina
Via: My Nokia Blog

Advertisement

What's your reaction?
Love It
0%
Like It
0%
Want It
0%
Had It
0%
Hated It
0%
About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!