HTC exec slams Samsung over “cheap plastic” phones

Advertisement

Despite early rumors suggesting that Samsung might finally leave plastic behind for the Galaxy S5, and deliver a smartphone carved from a chunk of metal, last month saw the company launch another plastic handset. What about those rumors claiming that there might be some “premium” version of the GS5 that would separately deliver a metal body? We recently saw those shot down by J.K. Shin himself. But now HTC is here with its new One, a phone that not only has top-shelf components inside, but a metal exterior that delivers the same refined flavor outside. Unsurprisingly, HTC is taking advantage of the position it finds itself in to criticize Samsung for its seeming inability to move beyond plastics.

HTC America President Jason Mackenzie had some choice words to say about Samsung in an interview this week, calling Samsung “a company that’s focused on investing in advertising” rather than on advancing its smartphones, a choice “that’s evident when you look at that product.”

While Mackenzie acknowledges that some shoppers just don’t care about whether or not their phones are cheap-feeling, HTC is “going after a different customer, someone who wants the best.”

HTC’s bravado may resonate with Android fans who have been growing dissatisfied with Samsung’s reluctance to really shake up its designs, but it’s still difficult to argue with Samsung’s bottom line; HTC can talk about premium materials all it wants, but what does that matter if it can’t find enough of these “customers who want the best” to actually buy its phones?

Source: Business Insider
Via: Droid-life

Advertisement

What's your reaction?
Love It
0%
Like It
0%
Want It
0%
Had It
0%
Hated It
0%
About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!