Official Nexus 7 folio case damages tablet

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Google does a great job when it comes to selling some very affordable, competitively performing Android hardware: we’ve come to expect nothing less from the company’s Nexus family. But for all those awesome values on smartphones and tablets, the accessory situation has been a lot less attractive. While it might sound nice to get an officially sanctioned case to go with your new Nexus 5 or Nexus 7, Google’s prices are on the steep side of things, and the designs haven’t always won us over. But for all their failings, at least you could be comfortable knowing that official cases are going to fit your hardware like a glove, and offer a problem-free experience… right? We might have to rethink that, after seeing what the official Nexus 7 folio case can do to that tablet.

The guys at Android Central picked up a Nexus 7 folio last year – this is the case that’s a cross between a bumper and a fold-together stand (see below) – and it’s been living on that tablet ever since. Recently one of them thought to give the tablet a spin for a while with the case removed, and found that the bright red plastic had left some indelible orange-ish marks on the tablet itself.

Sure, you could always pop the cover back on and cover them up, but shouldn’t we expect a little more from our accessories – especially when were talking about a case that sells for $50, a good 20% of the cost of the tablet itself?

Have you ever had an official accessory end up damaging your phone or tablet? Share your story in the comments.

n7-folioSource: Android Central

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!