CommBadge takes a second shot at making your Star Trek dreams a reality

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Back in the long, long ago (well, 2012, but even that’s about two phones ago for some of us), we told you about a cool crowdfunding project to make the dream of a wearable, Star-Trek-style communication badge a reality: the CommBadge. Sure, there are more Bluetooth headsets in existence than we know what to do with, but instead of living in your ear, CommBadge clips onto your shirt, just like – well, just like on Star Trek. Back then, we were looking at the start of the IndieGoGo campaign for the project, and while it didn’t ultimately hit its goal, it still raised enough to get started on production. In the many months since, the team behind CommBadge has struggled to bring its hardware into existence, and while there have been many setbacks, progress is still coming along. Now a new wave of funding has opened to help CommBadge climb over that last hump and finally start getting into the hands of users.

While the CommBadge design is reportedly about 90% of the way there, the team wants to come up with a better PCB layout, specifically with the intent of tweaking antenna placement for superior range, and is raising money to make that change happen. Assuming the majority of the problems ran into earlier during the design and fabrication process have been resolved, the final CommBadge units based on this updated PCB might be available as soon as this summer.

Unlike the old IndieGoGo campaign, this new Kickstarter will only be funded if it hits its $20,000 target; if you’re feeling a bit apprehensive about contributing to a project that’s already a year behind schedule in delivering hardware to its funders, that difference might help ease your concerns.

Source: Kickstarter

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!