Devs working to bring Nokia app store to Androids everywhere

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When it comes to the Nokia X (and X+, and XL), Nokia is playing by its own set of rules. That means an Android experience that’s a bit different from what you’re used to, a change motivated in no small part by the absence of Google apps. With no Play Store to turn to, Nokia’s put together its own Android app store, to which Nokia X users will turn for their software fix. Curious to see what they’ll be working with? Look no further than a helpful project from the resourceful guys over at XDA-Developers, making the Nokia app store available for installation on regular old Androids.

This is very much a work in progress, and while it’s already shown some improvement (no longer requiring root to install), it’s still in pretty rough shape – we just gave it a spin and while the app loads successfully, it doesn’t seem able to connect to Nokia’s servers. Other users have seen more success, and it isn’t clear yet if the problems are a result of specific phone configurations, or if Nokia has just started blocking connections.

If you’re feeling game, follow up the source link and give it a shot, but you might be better off waiting just a little longer until some of these kinks get worked out – assuming that’s possible. Considering that some pretty major markets won’t be getting the Nokia X, this might be your best shot for a while at checking out what things look like over on the Nokia side of the fence. Well, short of picking up a Windows Phone handset, anyway.

Source: XDA-Developers forums
Via: XDA-Developers

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!