Samsung has not forgotten about 64-bit; “there’s a real demand, whether you need it or not”

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What is going on with Samsung’s efforts to deliver a 64-bit Exynos chip? The company confirmed plans for such a processor just days after Apple’s announcement of the iPhone 5S (with that 64-bit A7 of its own) last summer, but ever since then we’ve been a little unsure of just how far along the company’s work might be. Some reports suggested that a 64-bit Exynos would arrive sooner than not, and maybe even in time for the Galaxy S 5 (which, clearly, has not happened). Other statements from Samsung had us thinking that the chip might be further off, sometime in the second half of this year. Yesterday Samsung shared news of its latest Exynos chips, with nary a 64-bit component among them. Is this 64-bit Exynos still in the pipeline? Samsung says “yes,” but it’s not quite there yet.

According to Samsung exec Kyushik Hong, the company will likely introduce its 64-bit Exynos sometime before the end of the year. Samsung is counting on its chips being ready to go by the time Android fully supports such 64-bit processors; we’ve already talked about how the 64-bit groundwork has been laid in Linux, and it’s just a matter of bringing Android around to the same place.

Hong also talks about Samsung’s aspirations to get its chips into other OEMs’ products, hoping to compete more directly with the Qualcomms of the world. And for all you nay-sayers who can’t see the phrase “64-bit smartphone” without screaming “but phones don’t even NEED to be 64-bit,” Hong seems like a sympathetic voice. “64-bit is very important,” he explains, “in the sense that there’s a real demand, whether you need it or not.”

Source: CNET

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!