Alcatel unveils One Touch Idol 2, Idol 2 Mini, and Pop Fit

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While the big news at MWC is coming from those companies hosting large press events, we knew going in that we’d also be hearing a lot from some of the smaller players. Sure, they may not have handsets that capture our imagination for months, like the Galaxy S 5 has managed to, but this is a big industry, with room for flagships and budget models alike. Today, we learn about a few of the latter from Alcatel, announcing its One Touch Idol 2, One Touch Idol 2 Mini, and the One Touch Pop Fit.

The Idol 2 runs a 1.2GHz quad-core SoC, has a five-inch 720p LCD, an 8MP rear camera with 1.3MP front-facer, and measures 7.3mm thick. The Idol 2 Mini, on the other hand, has a 4.5-inch qHD display, runs the same SoC, and while it has another 8MP main camera, its front-facer is a slightly higher-res 2MP component. Both will be available in 3G and LTE editions, with pricing looking like 230/290 euros for the Idol 2 (3G/LTE), and 170/210 euros for the Mini.

While those two are standard Android smartphones, the One Touch Pop Fit is a little weird, as Alcatel envisions it as a “wearable” of sorts. This is no smartwatch, though, and is better described as a lower-end Android with an armband. The Pop Fit has a tiny 2.8-inch QVGA display, 1GHz dual-core MediaTek SoC, 1000mAh batter, and 512MB of RAM. Unsurprisingly, it’s super-cheap, starting at just 90 euros. You even get 16GB storage at that price, with a 32GB option also available. The software package is geared towards jogging and music listening, so even if it’s not as petite as a smartwatch, we could see this resonating with certain users.

Source: Alcatel
Via: Engadget 1,2

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!