Will Google pressure kill the ASUS dual Android/Windows 8 convertible tablet?

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Of all the names you’re hearing mentioned as we look forward to what to expect from MWC 2014, you probably haven’t picked up on much chatter about ASUS. And really, considering how much hardware the company brought along to CES just last month, that’s perfectly understandable. One of the most promising devices ASUS launched back then was its Transformer Book Duet, a tablet with a keyboard dock that could instantly switch back and forth between Android and Windows 8. Been wondering about when it might see the light of day? Us too, but now a new rumor claims that day may never come, thanks to efforts from Google to dissuade ASUS from ever selling the tablet.

China’s Economic Daily News says that while ASUS had been planning to begin marketing the Transformer Book Duet in Asia and Europe before the end of March (with the US following by summer), that may not happen now because of “resistance from Google.”

We don’t know exactly what that means, nor do we see any evidence to back up that claim (other than the absence of sales having yet begun), so while we’re not quite willing to swallow this idea hook, line, and sinker, this wouldn’t be the first time a tablet like this crashed and burned.

Remember last year’s Samsung ATIV Q? Another very promising dual-mode Android/Windows design? We went hands-on with the device back in June, but it never did make it to retail. Sure, Google wasn’t specifically attached to rumors of why Samsung might be dropping the ATIV Q, but these dual-platform tablets are starting to feel like they’re a bit cursed.

Source: Digitimes
Via: BGR

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!