Nokia finally introduces Treasure Tag Bluetooth LE fobs

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We first heard of the Nokia Treasure Tag some seven months ago, and even all the way back then, its functionality was perfectly clear: a little battery-powered pendant that could be attached to your keys (or anything else you didn’t want to lose), and remained in contact with your phone by means of Bluetooth Low Energy – get too far out of range, and your phone would warn you. In the months that followed, renders of the device leaked, and despite an association in those pics with the Lumia 1520, the Treasure Tag failed to launch alongside the phablet. When we spotted a beta Treasure Tag app earlier this month, we wondered if the accessory was finally about to arrive. Sure enough, Nokia goes official with the gadget today.

It works just like we thought it would, and supports NFC for easy pairing with your phone. Up to four Treasure Tags can be linked to one handset, and the software allows you to assign Live Tiles to each. The Tags themselves are powered by non-rechargeable batteries, delivering about six months of use before they need to be replaced.

The Treasure Tag will be available in the four colors you see above, with sales beginning in April. Look for a retail price around $30.

We’re glad to finally see the Treasure Tag story get the ending it was in search of, but we’re also just the slightest bit underwhelmed. Maybe if they were a little cheaper, or didn’t have us out buying new batteries twice a year, we’d be more enthusiastic. Getting one might make sense, but four of them – and with all those batteries – could start getting expensive, right quick.

Source: Nokia

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!