MWC 2014 could be a Windows Phone no-show

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With the march forward to MWC 2014 now in full swing, the hazy rumors of hardware and software announcements are slowly coming in to focus, with some manufacturers already letting slip bits and pieces of their lineups a little early. With models like the Galaxy S 5 on the tip of everyone’s tongue, MWC is shaping up to be pretty Android-heavy, but we’re also expecting news about some other platforms: a Tizen announcement will hopefully lay out a timeline for the introduction of commercial hardware, and some new Firefox OS phones are confirmed. But what about Windows Phone? We know Nokia will be there, and we’re sure hoping that means the Android-powered Nokia X will join it, but could there also be some new Windows Phone gear joining it? A new report says “no,” and that MWC will be a virtual no-man’s-land so far as new WP8 hardware goes.

Admittedly, we didn’t have very firm expectations for any Nokia Windows Phone gear. We already got the Icon, so that’s out of the running, but what about phones like that Lumia 630/635 or even the rumored 930? Thinking more on it, we can understand how an MWC launch might be stretch; after all, the 630/635 is supposed to run Windows Phone 8.1, and we’re still probably over a month removed from the platform going official. Perhaps we’ll soon be learning of a separate, early spring Nokia event that will ultimately introduce such hardware.

Beyond Nokia, this would spell no new Windows Phone announcements from ZTE, Huawei, or even Samsung – assuming these sources are accurate, that 1080p model will just have to wait.

Source: re/code
Via: WMPoweruser

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!