Purported Galaxy S 5 fingerprint scanner details seem a bit rubbish

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Somewhere in our oversized utility bin filling up with Galaxy S 5 rumor after Galaxy S 5 rumor, there are several different reports about what we might hope to expect from the phone in terms of a fingerprint scanner – that is, assuming Samsung finally moves forward with such a project (after a false start with the Note 3). One of the most recent rumors suggested that the GS5 (as well as the next iPhone) could feature some advanced in-panel scanning technology which would let users authenticate themselves by simply pressing their finger up against the phone’s display. However, now a new leak goes into more detail on Samsung’s implementation, and describes a very different piece of scanner hardware.

According to these sources, the Galaxy S 5 will see its fingerprint scanner integrated into the phone’s home button (so, yes, hardware buttons would be returning), but unlike what Apple did with the iPhone 5S, this scanner would be a swipe-type design. And from the descriptions we’ve heard, it doesn’t sound like a particularly forgiving one, either, demanding a precise swipe speed and not tolerating moisture well.

The software side could be decent, at least, with the ability to store eight fingerprints, a real-time visual indicator of scan quality, and the ability to lock apps and files behind a private fingerprint-protected wall.

In the end, if it works well, we could probably live with swiping, but for the moment we’re a bit apprehensive. Are we going to be looking at another One Max here, or could Samsung really manage to repeat Apple’s success?

Source: SamMobile

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!